mauve-alert:

I feel like I’m at a point in my life where I know I need to advance the main quest, but instead I faff about doing side quests because the main quest is intimidating and I don’t feel like I’ve leveled up enough to be able to handle it.

(via zavocado)

ucresearch:

Neuroscience could alter feeling disappointed
Finding an antidote for feeling let-down may now be possible. Researchers at UC San Diego have identified a control mechanism for an area of the brain that processes sensory and emotive information that humans experience as feeling depressed.
“The idea that some people see the world as a glass half empty has a chemical basis in the brain,” said senior author Roberto Malinow. “What we have found is a process that may dampen the brain’s sensitivity to negative life events.”
Because people struggling with depression are believed to register negative experiences more strongly than others, the study’s findings have implications for understanding not just why some people have a brain chemistry that predisposes them to depression but also how to treat it.
Read more about the finding here →

ucresearch:

Neuroscience could alter feeling disappointed

Finding an antidote for feeling let-down may now be possible. Researchers at UC San Diego have identified a control mechanism for an area of the brain that processes sensory and emotive information that humans experience as feeling depressed.

“The idea that some people see the world as a glass half empty has a chemical basis in the brain,” said senior author Roberto Malinow. “What we have found is a process that may dampen the brain’s sensitivity to negative life events.”

Because people struggling with depression are believed to register negative experiences more strongly than others, the study’s findings have implications for understanding not just why some people have a brain chemistry that predisposes them to depression but also how to treat it.

Read more about the finding here →

(Source: Threadless)

grumpypedant:

I think a lot of people have trouble understanding transgender issues because they try to see themselves as trans, but come at it from the wrong direction. i.e. a cis woman tries to understand transness by going, “what if I felt like/wanted to be a man” when she should be approaching it as “what if I, a woman, was so easily mistaken for a man that I had to pretend to be one”,

And I think this is something to keep in mind and to explain away when trying to get these matters across to people who’re new to the idea.

(via gethinblake)

adrians:

adrians:

the best thing about having the house to myself is that I can make breakfast in my underwear

image

(via ikuyootori)

There is a reason that most fanfiction authors, specifically girls, start with a Mary Sue. It’s because girls are taught that they are never enough. You can’t be too loud, too quiet, too smart, too stupid. You can’t ask too many questions or know too many answers. No one is flocking to you for advice. Then something wonderful happens. The girl who was told she’s stupid finds out that she can be a better wizard than Albus Dumbledore. And that is something very important. Terrible at sports? You’re a warrior who does backflips and Legolas thinks you’re THE BEST. No friends? You get a standing ovation from Han Solo and the entire Rebel Alliance when you crash-land safely on Hoth after blowing up the Super Double Death Star. It’s all about you. Everyone in your favorite universe is TOTALLY ALL ABOUT YOU.

I started writing fanfiction the way most girls did, by re-inventing themselves.

Mary Sues exist because children who are told they’re nothing want to be everything.
There’s no point to a guy yelling, “Hey sexy baby” at me out of the passenger window of a car as it speeds past. Even if I was into creepy misogynists and wanted to give him my number, I couldn’t. The car didn’t even slow down. But that’s okay, because he wasn’t actually hitting on me. The point wasn’t to proposition me or chat me up. The only point was to remind me, and all women, that our bodies are his to stare at, assess, comment on, even touch. “Hey sexy baby” is the first part of a sentence that finishes, “this is your daily message from the patriarchy, reminding you that your body is public property”.

After reading about gender-bias and conversation dominance in the classroom, I asked for a peer to observe a physics class I was teaching and keep track of the discussion time I was giving to various students along with their race and gender. In this exercise, I knew I was being observed and I was trying to be extra careful to equally represent all students―but I STILL gave a disproportionate amount of discussion time to the white male students in my classroom (controlling for the overall distribution of genders and races in the class). I was shocked. It felt like I was giving a disproportionate amount of time to my white female and non-white students.

Even when I was explicitly trying, I still failed to have the discussion participants fairly represent the population of the students in my classroom.

This is a well-studied phenomena and it’s called listener bias. We are socialized to think women talk more than they actually do. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are ‘hogging the floor’ even when men are dominating.

Stop interrupting me: gender, conversation dominance and listener bias, by Jessica Kirkpatrick from Women In Astronomy

Implicit bias is a thing, just like privilege. Calling it out isn’t meant to shame anyone, but to alert us to step it up and improve ourselves so everyone can have a voice. Be conscious of what you and others are saying, and know when not to speak.

(via scientific-women)

(Source: itsawomansworld2, via ikuyootori)

76% of negative feedback given to women included personality criticism. For men, 2%. The study speaks to the impossible tightrope women must walk to do their jobs competently and to make tough decisions while simultaneously coming across as nice to everyone, all the time.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/28/opinion/sunday/learning-to-love-criticism.html (via maxofs2d)

When I was in my admin job, my “things you need to work on” at my review was “sometimes you seem to be annoyed by the IT guy”. Said by the Sales Director, who regularly swore and was sworn at by the IT guy, and they both kept actively trying to refuse to work with each other. (Fun fact: the IT guy pretty much hated everyone in the world. Also the time my boss was referring to was when the IT guy had printed out a suicide joke comic from the internet and shoved it in front of my face, and acted all hurt when I got angry instead of laughing.)

(via centrumlumina)

Fan fiction, fan art, the way female fans celebrate what they love: this stuff isn’t a secret anymore – and it shouldn’t be a punch line anymore, either. It’s a big messy world full of amateur writing and unedited work, but it’s also got of some of the best fiction I’ve ever read, published or otherwise. You don’t have to participate in it to afford it even a modicum of respect. I’ll be the first to volunteer if you ever want to learn. But if you’re not interested in that, politely decline to answer. It’s easy to blame the celebrity, dragged into answering these questions. But really, the fault lies with the media. Please, please, please journalists: stop asking celebrities about fan fiction. Unless you’re having an in-depth conversation about fictional constructions of the actors’ personae (like the very one you’ll be presenting in your piece?), it serves no purpose. Non-fans likely don’t get it; fans think you look like a bully – because you are.

Elizabeth Minkel, in her article "Why it doesn’t matter what Benedict Cumberbatch thinks of Sherlock fan fiction"

OMG OMG this article, THIS FUCKING ARTICLE. THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU

(via holmesianpose)

Brilliantly put..

(via generalgemini-booknerd)

(via centrumlumina)

mihlayn:

new zealand’s finest

mihlayn:

new zealand’s finest

(via foxnewsofficial)